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Music in Your Bones

It’s not just a saying. You can literally have music in your bones! 

Thanks to a phenomenon called “bone conduction”, which allows sounds to be transmitted and heard by the vibration in your bones rather than the vibration of air hitting your ear drum.

It’s why your voice sounds different when it recorded and played on a recording than it sounds when you hear yourself speak; and it’s the basis of certain hearing aids as well as some headsets worn by divers so they can receive messages from people out of the water.

In fact, it was Hugo Gernsback, of science fiction magazine fame (and the namesake of the Hugo Awards) who came up with the idea of a bone-conducting hearing aid, and it was the creation of a student at Parsons School of Design in New York that created it.

It includes a motor hooked up to the headphone jack of an iPod that lies against the wearer’s palate. To play your tunes, you manipulate the iPod’s controls with your tongue, and, thanks to the pulsing of the motor against your teeth, you can hear the music

Because bone conducts lower frequencies better than air does, your skull is a built-in sub-woofer. That’s due to a phenomenon called bone conduction, which allows sound to be transmitted by the vibration of bones rather than the vibration of air hitting your ear drum.

It’s why your voice on a recording sounds different than the voice you hear in your head; and that’s the basis of certain hearing aids as well as some headsets

Users will probably hear low notes much louder because bone conducts lower frequencies better than air does. Basically, your skull is a built-in subwoofer.