Who Watches the WWE

According to surveys, adults don’t like the WWE, but kids do. The, WWE, the acronym for “World Wrestling Entertainment” has as its primary audience children aged 6 to 10; and anyone over the age of ten can see that the WWE wrestling is about real wrestling as much as miniature golf is about professional golfing.

WWE is its most recent name, but it has gone through an entire alphabet soup of acronyms in its history; starting with CWC (Capitol Wrestling Corporation) in 1952 to the WWWF (World Wide Wrestling Federation), to the WWF (World Wrestling Federation) to finally the present, and far more accurate WWE: World Wrestling Entertainment.

Of all the titles, WWE is the most accurate, being obviously more about entertainment that real wrestling.(“real wresting” is what you see in high school, college and Olympic wrestling marches.

Anyone who has watched real wrestling matches, the ones you see in high school, college or Olympic wrestling matches will probably agree that they are not very “entertaining” and frankly rather boring as a spectator sport. So obviously, it not the ‘wrestling” that draws the audiences It was WWE wrestling superstar John Cena that recently conceded that “WWE matches were mostly aimed at children”.

It was WWE wrestling superstar John Cena that recently conceded that “WWE matches were mostly aimed at children”. Cena himself began as a typical ”evil bully” character, but noticed there were more kids in the crowd that “grownups”.

Now, Cena plays a good guy who promotes positive attitudes, both in the ring and in real life by participating with the Make-A-Wish Foundation saying: “I don’t want to offend anyone in our audience, so I enjoy being a superhero and an inspirational character in live entertainment”.

Maybe a few more WWE performers could adopt that kind of character as well.