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Music: MoreThan Just Songs

Research has found that learning music facilitates learning skills in other subjects, and enhances skills used in other areas. Studies show that s children with a good music-rich experience; either by singing, listening or dancing gives benefits to children as they are introduced to more formal learning. Making music involves more than the voice or playing an instrument; introducing a child to music creates several skill sets simultaneously. “Music learning supports all learning”.

For children ages two to nine, one of the benefits of music is “language development”. While children come into the world ready to understand sounds and words, music education helps enhance those natural abilities. Music advances a child’s language development, and those inborn capacities need to be reinforced, practiced, celebrated” by introducing music in the home as well as a more formal music education.

The effect of a music education on language development can be seen in the brain. Recent studies have clearly indicated that musical training “physically develops the part of the left side of the brain known to be involved with processing language”, and can actually wire the brain’s circuits in specific ways; learning new song help the brain imprint information on young minds.

In other words, music can Increase IQ, makes the brain work, and helps children solve math problem and improve their test scores. A study published in 2007 revealed that students in elementary schools with superior music education programs scored nearly 22% higher in English and 20% higher in math scores on standardized tests, compared to schools with little or no music programs.

Music can improve a child’s abilities in learning and other tasks, but it’s important to understand that music itself does not make them “smarter”. Instead music teaches discipline and develops creativity, making them more open to learning.